Avid hikers and explorers, Tony and Liz Fricke (pictured here at Abbot Pass in Alberta’s Rocky Mountains) support the Nature Conservancy of Canada through its Leaders in Conservation program. Photo by A. Querner

Avid hikers and explorers, Tony and Liz Fricke (pictured here at Abbot Pass in Alberta’s Rocky Mountains) support the Nature Conservancy of Canada through its Leaders in Conservation program. Photo by A. Querner

The satisfaction that comes with “results you can walk on” is just one reason that Calgarians Tony and Liz Fricke support the Nature Conservancy of Canada (NCC). As members of NCC’s Leaders in Conservation (LIC) program, the couple makes an annual donation to the organization, and as a welcome side benefit, the Frickes have enjoyed many unique opportunities to explore the landscapes in southern Alberta they’ve helped protect.

“We have seen the land becoming increasingly fragmented with development,” says Liz. “Making annual donations to NCC is a way of saving some of that land for wildlife.” 

The Frickes have participated in several events offered to Alberta’s LIC members to tour NCC properties alongside conservation experts and other LIC donors. These have included memorable trips to the Waterton Park Front Project and the Waldron Ranch in Alberta, a 30,535-acre (12,357-hectare) site on the eastern slopes of the Rocky Mountains. LIC events also allow donors to learn more about the history of a specific site.

Tony and Liz say it’s been enjoyable to visit properties with others who are leaving a legacy to the natural world and to our children or grandchildren. They’ve also attended photography workshops and lectures through the NCC Conservation Speaker Series. “We support NCC and they educate us,” says Tony.

NCC relies on donors like the Frickes, who have committed to giving $1,000 or more annually to the organization, says Jenel Bode, manager of major gifts and donor engagement for NCC’s Alberta Region. 

“Our Leaders in Conservation program provides us with a reliable source of funding so we can continue our stewardship work in each region,” says Bode. “Having people commit to a certain level of donation each year allows us to make better forecasts, plan ahead with more certainty and be more strategic.”

 



Comment